Agency Profile: We are proud to welcome Minority Business Center Bronx, NY to the African Union Expo 2016

The Minority Business Center Bronx, New York, will be providing business, consulting and related services for small businesses during the Expo.

Visit AfricanUnionExpo.org for more information for Merchants and general Attendees or email  info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002

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The Minority Business Center Bronx, New York, is one of two centers in the New York area, and of 33 centers throughout the nation.

The Minority Business Center Bronx, NY is operated and managed by the South Bronx Overall Economic Development Corporation (SoBRO).  SoBRO’s business programs have a proven track record of providing assistance to minority entrepreneurs since 1972.  These programs, in conjunction with the staff expertise of the Minority Business Center, will allow for comprehensive assistance to minority businesses across all categories.

Our Center is committed to providing business owners with the knowledge, skills, and access to resources they need to grow and prosper.logo_mbda

Through strategic and community partnerships, as well as our business assistance programs; such as: PTAC, M/WBE Technical Assistance, Industrial Business Zone program, EAP and Credit Inc. (CDFI), we ensure that entrepreneurs not only reach their goals, but excel beyond them.

The Center’s staff of business professionals will continue to grow strategic relationships with banks, loan officers, city, state and federal agency staff, chambers of commerce, and private sector companies to provide the broadest selection of opportunities for success in the local and global economy.

Location:

 

555 Bergen Avenue, 3rd Floor- Bronx, New York 10455

T 718. 732.7580 F 718.292.3115

shiggins@sobro.org

http://www.mbda.gov/businesscenters/southbronx

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Merchant Profile: We are proud to welcome Behind The Curl. as a Merchant at the African Union Expo 2016

Behind The Curl, will be providing Hair Care products and services during the Expo.

Visit AfricanUnionExpo.org for more information for Merchants and general Attendees or email  info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002

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Behind The Curl, sells organic hair/skin products for men and women.Behind The Curl is based in Harlem, New York and also sells their products  online at behindthecurl.com. Behind The Curl’s products are made in the US with 100% organic raw shea butter and essential oils. They are designed to soften hair and skin and to moisturize and seal the hair cuticle. cropped-btc-logo-for-wordpress1

 

Behind The Curl, can be reach on  social media via  @behindthecurl on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

 

Email Address: info@behindthecurl.com

 

Mailing Address: 330 E 109th Street #6D New York, NY 10029

 

Phone: 646-765-1390

 

Financial Services Merchant Profile: We are proud to welcome BOC Capital Corp. as a Merchant at the African Union Expo 2016

BOC Capital will be providing  Financial services assistance and will also be participating in the Business review sessions for selected candidates.
Visit AfricanUnionExpo.org for more information for Merchants and general Attendees or email  info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002

 

About BOC Capital:  @BOCNetwork

Founded in 2001, BOC Capital Corp., an affiliate of the Business Outreach Center (BOC) Network, is a not-for-profit Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) and a certified Community Development Entity (CDE) dedicated to providing micro-enterprise financing, with a special focus on small-business, women, minority and immigrant entrepreneurs. boc-capital-google-search download

Locations:

Bronx Office:

1231 Lafayette Avenue

Bronx, New York 10474

Queens Office:
96-11 40th Road
Corona, NY 11368

Brooklyn/Central Office:
85 South Oxford Street, 2nd Fl.
Brooklyn, NY 11217
tel.: 718 624-9115

Merchant Profile: We are proud to welcome Vivere chocolates as a Merchant at the African Union Expo 2016

Vivere chocolates will be providing samples highlighting their  chocolates and other products and services.
Visit AfricanUnionExpo.org for more information for Merchants and general Attendees or email  info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002

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Vivere! pronounced (vi-ve-re) meaning: TO LIVE!

Vivere is not only the name of the company but the very premise the company is founded on. In a world where distraction and despair can easily consume your day, we choose to celebrate life and live it on our own terms. This coupled with our love for amazing chocolate has lead us here. We worked with seasoned chocolatiers to develop a line of confections that we are proud to bring to you. It is said that time is the one true luxury and we believe there’s always time for chocolate. 

Our artisanal chocolates are handmade using a premium blend of all natural, 70% chocolate and fresh cream ganaches, which are crafted out of a blend of cacao beans from Africa, Central America, and South America.

Contact Us

We love to hear from our customers!Contact our Chocolate Shoppe to place an order by phone, inquire about a product, or request a catalog.

info@cocoavivere.com

Phone: 908.509.1848

img_20150504_192504_138_large

Standard Hours for Telephone Ordering and Inquiries:

Monday-Thursday 9:00am – 6:00pm Central Time
Friday 9:00am – 5:00pm Central Time

Address:
Vivere Corporate Office:
210 High Street.
Hackettstown, NJ 07840

Hackettstown, NJ 07840
 on Twitter! If you have an urgent inquiry. it’s better to email or call us.

Facebook: facebook.com/cocoavivere slideshow_1-1
Connect with us on Facebook to hear about our new products, promotions, contests, tasting events and more.

Merchant Profile: We are proud to welcome The Harlem Brewing Co. as a Merchant at the African Union Expo 2016

The Harlem Brewing Company will be providing  beer and food pairings with African & Caribbean cuisines highlighting the alligator pepper  and other spices in the their products.
Visit AfricanUnionExpo.org for more information for Merchants and general Attendees or email  info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002

Celeste Beatty and her team are a minority women owned business that has been doing great things since their inception. The product are now carried by FreshDirect & WalMart which speaks volumes towards their journey and success.

More details on the Harlem Brewing Company are below:

Back_Card

the first brews were made in her studio apartment right across from Marcus Garvey Park. She’d finally opened the gift of a home brew kit that sat in the closet for several weeks (that might explain why the first brewed weren’t such a hit). So, she kept on brewing, never giving up on perfecting her recipes. After challenges trying to open a local brewery, she took her home grown recipes to Olde Saratoga Brewery, working closely with Paul and Chris, both fine brewers, Beer (1)bottling her flagship Harlem Brew-Sugar Hill Golden Ale. On June 19, 2001,none of the packaging materials were ready so recycled beer boxes were gathered. With the amazing support from family, friends and neighbors (Uncle Arthur drove a Penske truck full of the first batch of beer over the river and through an upstate area called Harlem Valley back to 125th Street), Harlem Brewing Company launched at the Studio Museum in Harlem.

visit http://www.harlembrewing.com for more information HBCLogo

We are proud to announce the support of The National Urban League for the 2nd African Union Business Expo to be held on 11/15/2016 at MIST Harlem from 10am -7pm.

We are proud to announce the support of The National Urban League  for the 2nd African Union Business Expo to be held on 11/15/2016 at MIST Harlem from 10am -7pm.  Register to win up to 1,000.00! at

at http://africanunionexpo.org/events/african-union-expo-2016-nyc-harlem-on-11152016-from-10am-7pm/

or email info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002 to the attend or to request further  information

follow: #AfricanUnionExpo2016

This year will feature 2 new events:

  • Go Africa Startup Contest (for entrepreneurs, startups and small companies)
    • General category
      • 10 min presentation of your business with 5 min Q&A from the Audience and Judges:
      • 1,000 cash (First Prize)
      • 250 Gift Card (Second Prize)
      • 150 Gift Card (Third Prize)
    • Innovation & idea Category
    • Contestant has an innovation or idea that is in the incubation, development stage
      • 10 min presentation of your business with 5 min Q&A from the Audience and Judges:
      • 150 Gift Card (First Prize)
      • 100 Gift Card (Second Prize)
      • 75 Gift Card (Third Prize)

Contestant, Individual or Business can only compete and/or win in one of the categories but not both.

  • Business Review (business plan review and financing, planning assessment) Featuring the following:
    • Individual planning and assessment with Go Africa Capital LLC and a financial institution for your business or startup.
    • Individualized scoring and funding proposal created for your business
  • If the funding proposal is accepted by all parties involved, funding will be provided within 60 – 120 days.
  • See (business Review Section for more details on the criteria, and other parameters

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About the National Urban League: nul-images-4

Our Mission
The mission of the Urban League movement is to enable African Americans to secure economic self-reliance, parity, power and civil rights.

Our History
The National Urban League, which has played so pivotal a role in the 20th-Century Freedom Movement, grew out of that spontaneous grassroots movement for freedom and opportunity that came to be called the Black Migrations. When the U.S. Supreme Court declared its approval of segregation in the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson decision, the brutal system of economic, social and political oppression the White South quickly adopted rapidly transformed what had been a trickle of African Americans northward into a flood. nulu-logo nul_footer_logo

Those newcomers to the North soon discovered they had not escaped racial discrimination. Excluded from all but menial jobs in the larger society, victimized by poor housing and education, and inexperienced in the ways of urban living, many lived in terrible social and economic conditions.

Still, in the degree of difference between South and North lay opportunity, and that African Americans clearly understood. But to capitalize on that opportunity, to successfully adapt to urban life and to reduce the pervasive discrimination they faced, they would need help. That was the reason the Committee on Urban Conditions Among Negroes was established on September 29, 1910 in New York City. Central to the organization’s founding were two remarkable people: Mrs. Ruth Standish Baldwin and Dr. George Edmund Haynes, who would become the Committee’s first executive secretary.

Mrs. Baldwin, the widow of a railroad magnate and a member of one of America’s oldest families, had a remarkable social conscience and was a stalwart champion of the poor and disadvantaged. Dr. Haynes, a graduate of Fisk University, Yale University, and Columbia University (he was the first African American to receive a doctorate from that institution), felt a compelling need to use his training as a social worker to serve his people.
A year later, the Committee merged with the Committee for the Improvement of Industrial Conditions Among Negroes in New York (founded in New York in 1906), and the National League for the Protection of Colored Women (founded in 1905) to form the National League on Urban Conditions Among Negroes. In 1920, the name was later shortened to the National Urban League.

The interracial character of the League’s board was set from its first days. Professor Edwin R. A. Seligman of Columbia University, one of the leaders in progressive social service activities in New York City, served as chairman from 1911 to 1913. Mrs. Baldwin took the post until 1915.

The fledgling organization counseled black migrants from the South, helped train black social workers, and worked in various other ways to bring educational and employment opportunities to blacks. Its research into the problems blacks faced in employment opportunities, recreation, housing, health and sanitation, and education spurred the League’s quick growth. By the end of World War I the organization had 81 staff members working in 30 cities.

In 1918, Dr. Haynes was succeeded by Eugene Kinckle Jones who would direct the agency until his retirement in 1941. Under his direction, the League significantly expanded its multifaceted campaign to crack the barriers to black employment, spurred first by the boom years of the 1920s, and then, by the desperate years of the Great Depression. Efforts at reasoned persuasion were buttressed by boycotts against firms that refused to employ blacks, pressures on schools to expand vocational opportunities for young people, constant prodding of Washington officials to include blacks in New Deal recovery programs and a drive to get blacks into previously segregated labor unions.

As World War II loomed, Lester Granger, a seasoned League veteran and crusading newspaper columnist, was appointed Eugene Kinckle Jones successor.

Outspoken in his commitment to advancing opportunity for blacks, Granger pushed tirelessly to integrate the racist trade unions and led the League’s effort to support A. Philip Randolph’s March on Washington Movement to fight discrimination in defense work and in the armed services. Under Granger, the League, through its own Industrial Relations Laboratory, had notable success in cracking the color bar in numerous defense plants. The nation’s demand for civilian labor during the war also helped the organization press ahead with greater urgency its programs to train black youths for meaningful blue-collar employment. After the war those efforts expanded to persuading Fortune 500 companies to hold career conferences on the campuses of Negro colleges and place blacks in upper-echelon jobs.

Of equal importance to the League’s own future sources of support, Granger avidly supported the organization of its volunteer auxiliary, the National Urban League Guild, which, under the leadership of Mollie Moon, became an important national force in its own right.

The explosion of the civil rights movement provoked a change for the League, one personified by its new leader, Whitney M. Young, Jr., who became executive director in 1961. A social worker like his predecessors, he substantially expanded the League’s fund-raising ability and, most critically, made the League a full partner in the civil rights movement. Although the League’s tax-exempt status barred it from protest activities, it hosted at its New York headquarters the planning meetings of A. Philip Randolph, Martin Luther King, Jr., and other civil rights leaders for the 1963 March on Washington. Young was also a forceful advocate for greater government and private-sector efforts to eradicate poverty. His call for a domestic Marshall Plan, a ten-point program designed to close  the huge social and economic gap between black and white Americans, significantly influenced the discussion of the Johnson Administration’s War on Poverty legislation.

Young’s tragic death in 1971 in a drowning incident off the coast of Lagos, Nigeria brought another change in leadership. Vernon E. Jordan, Jr., formerly Executive Director of the United Negro College Fund, took over as the League’s fifth Executive Director in 1972 (the title of the office was changed to President in 1977). For the next decade, until his resignation in December 1981, Jordan skillfully guided the League to new heights of achievement. He oversaw a major expansion of its social service efforts, as the League became a significant conduit for the federal government to establish programs and deliver services to aid urban communities, and brokered fresh initiatives in such League programs as housing, health, education and minority business development. Jordan also instituted a citizenship education program that helped increase the black vote and brought new programs to such areas as energy, the environment, and non-traditional jobs for women of color-and he developed The State of Black America report.

In 1982, John E. Jacob, a former chief executive officer of the Washington, D.C. and San Diego affiliates who had served as Executive Vice President, took the reins of leadership, solidifying the League’s internal structure and expanding its outreach even further.

Jacob established the Permanent Development Fund in order to increase the organization’s financial stamina. In honor of Whitney Young, he established several programs to aid the development of those who work for and with the League: The Whitney M. Young, Jr. Training Center, to provide training and leadership development opportunities for both staff and volunteers; the Whitney M. Young, Jr. Race Relations Program, which recognizes affiliates doing exemplary work in race relations; and the Whitney M. Young, Jr. Commemoration Ceremony, which honors and pays tribute to long term staff and volunteers who have made extraordinary contributions to the Urban League Movement.

Jacob established the League’s NULITES youth development program and spurred the League to put new emphasis on programs to reduce teenage pregnancy, help single female heads of households, combat crime in black communities, and increase voter registration.

Hugh B. Price, appointed to the League’s top office in July 1994, took over the reins at a critical moment for the League, for black America, and for the nation as a whole. In the early 90’s, the fierce market-driven dynamic of “globalization,” was sweeping the world, fundamentally altering the economic relations among and within countries and reshaping the link between the nation’s citizenry and its economy, fostering enormous uncertainty among individuals and tensions among ethnic and cultural groups.

This economic change and the efforts of some to rollback the gains African Americans fashioned since the 1960s made the League’s efforts all the more necessary. Price, a lawyer with extensive experience in community development and public policy issues, intensified the organization’s work in three broad areas: in education and youth development, individual and community-wide economic empowerment, affirmative action and the promotion of inclusion as a critical foundation for securing America’s future as a multi-ethnic democracy.

Among Price’s most notable achievements was establishing the League’s Institute of Opportunity and Equality in Washington, DC, which conducted research and public policy analysis of urban issues and the Campaign for African American Achievement, a community mobilization and advocacy initiative created to raise awareness and promote the importance of achievement through the formation of the National Achievers Society, “Doing the Right Thing” recognition in local communities and the National Urban League’s Scholarship Program.

On May 15, 2003 the Board of Trustees of the National Urban League voted overwhelmingly to appoint former New Orleans Mayor Marc H. Morial as the League’s eighth President and Chief Executive Officer. As New Orleans Chief Executive, he was one of the most popular and effective mayors in the city’s history, leaving office with 70% approval rating. After being elected as one of the youngest mayors in the city’s history, crime plummeted by 60% a corrupt Police Department was reformed, new programs for youth were started and stagnant economy was reignited.

Since his appointment to the National Urban League, Morial has worked to reenergize the movement’s diverse constituencies by building on the strengths of the NUL’s 95 year old legacy and increasing the organization’s profile both locally and nationally.

In his first year, Morial worked to streamline the organization’s headquarters, secured over $10 million dollars in new funding to support affiliate programs, created the first Legislative Policy Conference “NUL on the Hill’, revamped the State of Black America report, created profitability for the annual conference, and secured a $127.5 million equity fund for  minority businesses through the new markets tax credit program. He introduced and developed a stronger strategic direction of the organization with a “five point empowerment agenda’ that focuses on closing the equality gaps which exist for African Americans and other emerging ethnic communities in education, economic empowerment, health and quality of life, civic engagement, and civil rights and racial justice.

We are proud to announce the support of Carver Bank for the 2nd African Union Business Expo to be held on 11/15/2016 at MIST Harlem from 10am -7pm.

We are proud to announce the support of Carver Bank  for the 2nd African Union Business Expo to be held on 11/15/2016 at MIST Harlem from 10am -7pm.  Register to win up to 1,000.00! at

at http://africanunionexpo.org/events/african-union-expo-2016-nyc-harlem-on-11152016-from-10am-7pm/

or email info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002 to the attend or to request further  information

follow: #AfricanUnionExpo2016

This year will feature 2 new events:

  • Go Africa Startup Contest (for entrepreneurs, startups and small companies)
    • General category
      • 10 min presentation of your business with 5 min Q&A from the Audience and Judges:
      • 1,000 cash (First Prize)
      • 250 Gift Card (Second Prize)
      • 150 Gift Card (Third Prize)
    • Innovation & idea Category
    • Contestant has an innovation or idea that is in the incubation, development stage
      • 10 min presentation of your business with 5 min Q&A from the Audience and Judges:
      • 150 Gift Card (First Prize)
      • 100 Gift Card (Second Prize)
      • 75 Gift Card (Third Prize)

Contestant, Individual or Business can only compete and/or win in one of the categories but not both.

  • Business Review (business plan review and financing, planning assessment) Featuring the following:
    • Individual planning and assessment with Go Africa Capital LLC and a financial institution for your business or startup.
    • Individualized scoring and funding proposal created for your business
  • If the funding proposal is accepted by all parties involved, funding will be provided within 60 – 120 days.
  • See (business Review Section for more details on the criteria, and other parameters.

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We are Proud to have Carver Bank. Carver Bank will be in attendance to help immigrants, African Americans and the Diaspora community progressively move toward a positive financial future. 

For more information contact:

Tyrell Charles

Marketing, Events & Social Media Intern

Carver Federal Savings Bank

75 W 125th Street n New York, NY 10027

tyrell.charles@carverbank.com n o: 212.360.8890

On FaceBook at: @CarverFederalSavingsBank  Twitter: https://twitter.com/CarverBankNYC

at LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/carver-federal-savings-bank

About Carver Federal Savings Bank: Print

Carver was founded in 1948 to serve African-American communities whose residents, businesses, and institutions had limited access to mainstream financial services. Today, Carver is the largest African-American operated bank in the United States. Since its inception, the Bank has continuously been headquartered in Harlem, and most of our ten branches and 24/7 ATM Centers are located in low- to moderate- income neighborhoods. To share in Carver’s history Click Here to Watch.

Carver Bank has been designated by the U.S. Treasury Department as a Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) because of Carver’s community-focused banking services and dedication to the economic viability and revitalization of underserved neighborhoods.logo

A measure of its progress in achieving this goal includes the Bank’s most recent “Outstanding” Community Reinvestment Act rating.

If you have a question about Carver products and services or about your account, you may conveniently reach us in person, by phone, by mail, or online via our secure messaging system for account holders through Carver Online Banking. For all general queries, our Customer Service Center is available to assist you Monday through Wednesday from 8:30 am to 7:00 pm, Thursday through Friday from 8:30 am to 8:00 pm, and Saturday from 9 am to 2 pm at (718) 230-2900 or via email at customer.service@carverbank.com. For more specific queries, please select from the list below.

To report a lost or stolen ATM/ Reloadable Debit Card

Please call (718) 230-2900. We’ll cancel your card and issue a replacement immediately.

In Person

Locate a Carver branch or office.

By Phone

Customer Service Center (718) 230-2900
24-Hour Telephone Banking (718) 230-2900
Residential Mortgage Services (718) 230-2900
Business Banking (718) 230-2900
Commercial Lending (718) 230-2900
Investment Management Services (718) 230-2900

By Mail

All general inquiries should be mailed to the address below.

Carver Federal Savings Bank
75 West 125th Street
New York, NY 10027